the holy city

Images of downtown as well as West Ashley, Mount Pleasant, James and Johns Islands, Folly Beach, Isle of Palms, etc. Because Charleston is the best city in America!
Submissions are welcome, y'all. FY Charleston!

Posts tagged folly beach.

Parking at Bowen’s IslandFolly Beach, SC 

Parking at Bowen’s Island
Folly Beach, SC 

(Source: Flickr / wallyg)

507 E ArcticFolly Beach, SC

507 E Arctic
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: thennowlateron.com)

Sea turtles: worth savingFolly Beach, SC 

Sea turtles: worth saving
Folly Beach, SC 

(Source: facebook.com)

Historical postcardFolly Beach, SC

Historical postcard
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: facebook.com)

Law Office Folly Beach, SC

Law Office
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: charlestonsouthernhomes.com)

Farmers Market Folly Beach, SC

Farmers Market
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: facebook.com)

E. Arctic Ave and 6thFolly Beach, SC

E. Arctic Ave and 6th
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: nostalgicccc)

oh-susanna:


Shells on Folly Beach, SC

oh-susanna:

Shells on Folly Beach, SC

(via daytoday)

1120 Arctic Avenue
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: beachandresort.com)

Dry and windwornFolly Beach, SC 

Dry and windworn
Folly Beach, SC 

(Source: Flickr / mhlucero, via intracoastal-wanderings)

More "renourishment" effortsFolly Beach, SC

More "renourishment" efforts
Folly Beach, SC

(Source: facebook.com)

"Renourishment" at the west end of Folly Island, high tideFolly Beach, SC
Why “renourishment” is not a good idea: Barrier islands are a natural habitat with their own natural processes, and the shifting of an island’s borders due to erosion, even if quickened by human activity, is a normal part of a barrier island’s existence. Renourishment is an interference with this natural process. The sand that is put in place by such human activity usually erodes faster (two or three times faster) than the natural sand on the beach, therefore adding to the problem, not fixing it. Renourishment also potentially damages and destroys marine and beach life by burying it, squishing it under bulldozers, changing the beach contours, and making the water near the beach too muddy. Plants, insects, turtles, shorebirds, and other animals can be harmed by such activity. While renourishment is better than other human attempts to stabilize beaches, such as building seawalls or groynes, it’s only a short-term solution and does nothing to stop erosion. If we get out of the way, the beach will take care of itself, and we can continue to enjoy it at a much lower cost. 
(Source)

"Renourishment" at the west end of Folly Island, high tide
Folly Beach, SC

Why “renourishment” is not a good idea: Barrier islands are a natural habitat with their own natural processes, and the shifting of an island’s borders due to erosion, even if quickened by human activity, is a normal part of a barrier island’s existence. Renourishment is an interference with this natural process. The sand that is put in place by such human activity usually erodes faster (two or three times faster) than the natural sand on the beach, therefore adding to the problem, not fixing it. Renourishment also potentially damages and destroys marine and beach life by burying it, squishing it under bulldozers, changing the beach contours, and making the water near the beach too muddy. Plants, insects, turtles, shorebirds, and other animals can be harmed by such activity. While renourishment is better than other human attempts to stabilize beaches, such as building seawalls or groynes, it’s only a short-term solution and does nothing to stop erosion. If we get out of the way, the beach will take care of itself, and we can continue to enjoy it at a much lower cost. 

(Source)

(Source: facebook.com)

welcometocollinwood:

Sign for Bowen’s IslandFolly Beach, SC

welcometocollinwood:

Sign for Bowen’s Island
Folly Beach, SC

charlestonpics:

Folly Sunrise

Folly Beach, SC

charlestonpics:

Folly Sunrise

Folly Beach, SC

myblogette:

Folly Beach, SC

myblogette:

Folly Beach, SC

(Source: 500px.com, via flitterling)

 
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